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Hoping to shake off some of the Christmas holiday period cobwebs Mrs M and I went on a morning visit to Charlecote Park. There had been a heavy frost the night before, the car was thoroughly iced up before we started and there was a thick, cold, fog laying low over the houses. The sun was trying to shine through but was being severely diffused by the pea-souper.

When we got to Charlecote, we found it too was laying beneath a thick fog and frost with the sun trying desperately and ineffectually to burn it off. The light that sifted through the fog though was glorious. Softened, it gave the trees and surrounding parkland an eerie, unearthly feel.

This image was taken with the Fuji X-T1 and 18-135, f/3.5 – 5.6 lens. I overexposed by a stop to ensure that I got the glow from the sun, and you can see that the sun itself, diffused by the fog, looks huge in the sky.

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This image was taken on a glorious November day in Exmouth, Devon. The temperature was unbelievably warm at 18 degrees. I was walking along the beach in a tee-shirt and I was still very warm.

Being November, the area did not have the summer quota of holiday-makers and the beach was virtually empty apart from a few people walking their dogs and enjoying the bizarre weather.

As you can see from the image the sun was quite low in the sky even though the time was eleven o’clock in the morning and it reflected gloriously off the sea. The clouds were fabulous and added extra depth to the scene. All I needed to get was a bit of foreground interest and that eventually came along in the form of two individuals walking towards me along the sea edge.

There were some buildings on the far left which unbalanced the composition and so I went for a square crop and excluded them. This left the scene centred on the two people on the beach. It was lucky that the people were easily discernible as male and female as this helped start a dialogue in my mind and the static appearance of the woman at the back and the walking attitude of the man gave me the title ‘Leaving’.

 

The photograph was taken on a Fujifilm X-T1 and an XF 18-135mm, f/3.5 – 5.6 LM OIS WR lens. ISO was 320 at 1/800sec and the aperture was set at f/18.0. I used this very small aperture despite the risks of diffraction as I wanted the sun to split into a start shape.

 

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A trip to Cosford RAF museum bought the opportunity not only to look at the fantastic collection of aircraft they have from the First World War to the Cold War but also to get some great close up and abstract images.

The image below is one I took of a safety ribbon which was attached to a Harrier jump jet. These ribbons are usually attached to pins on various part of weaponry etc  that have to be removed just before the plane takes off for combat.

I really liked the way that it looked like a snake waiting to strike. The top part of the ribbon – the chain – was lost in the deep shadow of the wing whilst the ribbon itself was illuminated in a shaft of light. the shadow of the ribbon I think is really excellent and adds to the feeling of depth.

I used my Fujifim X-T1 with the XF 18-135mm, f/3.5 – 5.6 LM OIS WR. Taken at 6400 ISO, 1/200sec at f/5.6.

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It was a visit to the Black Country Living Museum for today’s photo-meet. It really is such a good place to take photographs. You have historic housing, canals, industrial buildings from the late Victorian and early 20th centuries and people dressed in the period costumes wandering around  – currently First World War – and all this on a 26 acre site. There is a pub with sawdust on the floor with great beer, a traditional fish and chip shop and a restaurant that serves Black Country faggots and peas. What’s not to like.

The other good thing is that when you go you automatically get a pass for the museum that last the whole of the year – entry free of charge.

The image below is of the supports for the mining wheel of the Racecourse colliery. It was a glorious day with blue skies and autumn sun. Walking past the supports I looked up and could see the sun behind the tower, silhouetting the thick, wooden support beams of the wheel, I stepped on to the edge of the shadows of the tower on the ground and moved back and forth to the side until I could just see the sun around the edge of the structure. A small aperture set on the camera then ensured that I got the starburst effect.

Fujifilm X-T1, Fujinon XF 18-135mm, 1/250sec, f/16.0

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I took a trip out to Calke Abbey with two other members of the Viewfinder Club and I think we all went there with the hope of finding some images that we could use for the club’s assignment for this month, “Found still-Life”.

I think by the end of the afternoon shooting that we all found something to take back but it was as we were leaving the house through the central courtyard that I noticed this image. The interior walls of the courtyard were all being repaired and were covered with scaffolding. Over the scaffolding blue sheets of safety netting had been secured creating a blueish, cold, glow in the courtyard. However it was the view upwards that I particularly liked. The blue of the netting and the lines of the scaffolding poles created an eerie, mysterious, view upwards to the open sky.

I used my Fujifilm X-T1 and the 18-55mm f/2.8-4.0 zoom lens

 

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