Verdancy

I write the picture posts to this blog, using the images in the order that I took them. Currently, I am trawling through my photographs taken in 2016 and have now got to August of that year. My wife and I were on a trip to Batsford Arboretum in Gloucestershire on a (probably) rare sunny warm day which is where I took the following three photographs.
As I looked at the images, I was struck at how vibrant the green was in each of the images and how enjoyable it was just to look at them. They gave me a feeling of peace and well-being. Of course, green is supposed to be a more restful colour to the eye.

Our eye sees colour via the cone cells. People who see normally have three different types of cones cells, red, green and blue. Of the six to seven million cones cells we have, 45% are green. Our eyes need to work less to perceive a green colour. That must be the reason why hi-viz vests are fluorescent green.

All of these images were taken in the Arboretum using the sky to back-light them.

NATURES ROADMAP
Fujifilm X-T1, Fujinon XF35mm F/2 R WR

I particularly like the detail that has been picked up in this image by the light showing through the leaves. The venation pattern or veins in the leaf are clearly visible. What an amazing piece of natural architecture.

GREEN MANTLE
Fujifilm X-T1, Fujinon XF35mm F/2 R WR

This next shot is taken further away from the tree to show the leaves attached to the branch. Once again the contre-jour allows the construction of the leaf to be easily seen and the greens enhanced.

CHLORAPHYLL GLOW
Fujifilm X-T1, Fujinon XF35mm F/2 R WR

The last photograph is a back-lit fern which just has glorious shades of vibrant greens magnified by the sun.

 

 

Out and About: Batsford Arboretum

 

A trip down to the Cotswolds today and to the Batsford Arboretum. Mrs M and I haven’t been down there for a few months so it was time to re-acquaint ourselves with the fabulous arboreal shapes and colours at the arboretum.

The first surprise was that it wasn’t busy. Perhaps the appalling weather of the last few days had put people off. We also managed to grab some sandwiches and coffees without having to queue. Normally the excellent meals at the restaurant draw the crowds in at lunchtime.

Once amongst the trees proper, the air was warm and damp and the small streams that meander through the trees gurgled happily. The bird song was incredible, I can’t imagine how loud the dawn chorus is.

I took the Fujifilm X-T1 and the 35mm f/2.0 lens. I’m glad I did as the light amongst the dense trees (everything has just got larger and greener with the warm wet weather we have been having) was quite low and so ISO’s of 1600 and 3200 were common on the shoot with apertures of f/2.0

The picture below however is an exception as it was taken against the light looking up under the leaf with the sky behind so the auto ISO kept the level at 200. The exposure time was 1/80 second at f/6.4 aperture.

naturesroadmap-34381

 

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Out and About – Batsford Arboretum

We left Coventry under dark clouds and pouring rain, but once south of Stratford, the weather cleared up and by the time we got to Batsford Arboretum (after a delicious lunch at Prego in Broadway) the sun was out and it was very warm. In October? Go figure!

It looks like once again we had mis-timed the visit to the arboretum to see the changing colour of the leaves, as very few were actually in their autumn colours. Nevertheless we took the opportunity to have a wander around one of our favourite places in the Cotswolds.
I had decided to take the old Olympus E-1 out for a run today together with the Zuiko 14-54 MKII lens. This is such a good combination, and the E-1 is just a really nice camera to use. Yes, it’s only 6 megapixels and has a LCD screen only marginally bigger than a postage stamp, but ergonomically it is a delightful camera to use. The various buttons and wheels just fall right for the hand, the shutter is whisper quiet and the colours from the Kodak sensor are superb. I had removed the battery grip for this trip, as I am beginning to appreciate the reduction in weight and portability of bigger DSLR’s without this encumberance, and the solid, immensely strong E-1 is quite a weight on its own.

Here’s one from the day:

Batsford Arboretum
Batsford Arboretum – Olympus E-1